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CRANE HAND SIGNALS


When should the crane operator follow hand signals?

 

A crane operator should always move loads according to the established code of signals, and use a signaler. Hand signals are preferred and commonly used.

 

Who can give the hand signals? or Who can be a signaler?

  • a person qualified to give crane signals to the operator,
  • there should be only one designated signaler at a time,
  • if signalers are changing between each other, the one in charge should wear a clearly visible badge of authority,
  • a crane operator should move loads only on signals from one signaler,
  • a crane operator must obey STOP signals no matter who gives it.

 

What should you do when in charge of signaling?

 

The signaler must:

  • be in clear view of the crane operator,
  • have a clear view of the load and the equipment,
  • keep persons outside the crane's operating area,
  • never direct a load over a person.
  • Hold your hands away from your body so that the operator can clearly see them.

  • If You are in the direction of the sun hold hands to side of body out of shadow

  • Always give signals according to the operator's right or left.

  • Do not give more signals than the operator can perform at one time.

  • Use a middle-man to transfer hand signals when you can't see the operator, or a radio.

  • If multiple radios are being used on a jobsite be specific when calling or answering, which crane and what signalman or operator! Do not attempt to signal, hold a radio, and control the load all at once, get more help!

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Just pulling sheet piling Would they listen to me WHEN I said NO? This crane wasn't made for pulling sheets I didn't even have a PAT system to know the load pull or weight. Now I hope they will listen to the next CRANE Operator after repairs The problem was other operators had been doing it for years and I didn't want to appear to be different or special or bitchy. It was an important factor that I was at a 68 to 70 degree boom angle and working directly in front of the machine when it caved. Probably from years of stress and Thank God no one was injured but I was definitely shaken up and the door got bent and had to be pried. An experience that makes you think about the fact that previous stresses to a crane can cause a Safe lift to be Unsafe.

 

 

 

OSHA OFFERS TIPS FOR WORKING IN HOT WEATHER


WASHINGTON -- The sun and warm weather of summer can also bring special hazards for those working outdoors. To help employers and workers stay safe throughout the summer months, OSHA offers tips that can help prevent many heat-related deaths, illnesses, and injuries.

"The hot weather can present additional hazards to those who work outdoors or in very hot environments," said OSHA Administrator John Henshaw. "It's important that employers and workers know how to reduce heat related illnesses and fatalities. Simple precautions can often save lives."

The combination of heat, humidity and physical labor can lead to fatalities. The two most serious forms of heat related illnesses are heat exhaustion (primarily from dehydration) and heat stroke, which could be fatal. Signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke need immediate attention. Recognizing those warning signs and taking quick action can make a difference in preventing a fatality.

Protecting Yourself in the Sun is a revised pocket card that explains how to perform self-examinations to detect early stages of skin cancer. The card also describes common physical features of skin cancer that can be caused by exposure to the sun.

Working Outdoors is a OSHA fact sheet that offers advice on ways to protect against exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV), precautions to take if working in extreme heat, and how to protect against Lyme Disease and the West Nile Virus. The fact sheet also offers links for teenagers working at summer jobs.

OSHA's Heat Stress Card lists tips and precautions to prevent many heat-related deaths and injuries. Available in English and Spanish, this laminated fold-up card is free to employers to distribute to their workers. It offers a quick reference about heat-related injuries, including warning signs, symptoms and early treatment.

These OSHA publications can be downloaded from the agency's website www.osha.gov or obtained from the OSHA publications office, Rm. N3101, 200 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20210.

More information about heat and sun hazards can be found on OSHA's website, www.osha.gov and at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) www.cdc.gov and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) www.cdc.gov/niosh
OSHA Crane Standards http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=10826

 

Raise the load.

Cable up.

Index finger points up, hand & forearm make a small circular motion.

raise the load, line up

[]

Swing the boom.

Outstretched arm with index finger pointing in the desired direction.

 

[]

Raise the load slowly.

Cable up, slowly.

One hand is held flat, palm down, over the other hand which has a pointed index finger making a circular motion under the palm area

raise the load, line up

Raise the boom - Hold the load.

Outstretched arm, thumb pointing up, hand opening & closing.

[]

Lower the load slowly.

Cable down.

One hand is held flat, palm up, with the other hand having a downward pointed index finger making a circular motion over the palm area

lower boom or boom down

Lower the boom.

Outstretched arm, fingers clenched with thumb pointing down.

[]

Boom Up

Raise the boom.

Outstretched arm, fingers clenched with thumb pointing up.

extend boom

Trolley Out

Extend the boom.

Both arms outstretched, fingers clenched with both thumbs pointing outward.

retract boom

Retract the boom.

Both arms outstretched, fingers clenched with both thumbs pointing inward.

.

Walk the crane forward.

Forearms circling forward, away from the body.

Reverse the motion to walk the crane backward.

[]

Hold

 

Everything slow.

Palms together, slowly rubbing.

[]

Emergency Stop

Arms Crossed Waving

Routine Stop

Routine stop.

Arm extended, palm down.

 

 

 

 

SIGNALS OF SAFETY
Crane operators require skilled assistance in order to perform a job well. Performing well means doing it safely. An operator and the signal person can make a great safety team if they communicate and work together. Proper hand signals, a positive and alert attitude, and a good eye for procedures can lessen the risk of accidents or injuries to co-workers.

DAILY SAFETY
The designated signal person must be competent and know "all the right moves". As well, the signal person must wear a high visibility vest. A hand signal chart should be mounted on the crane unit so everyone knows the system. Crane, derrick, and hoisting equipment must be inspected daily. Be on the lookout for faulty equipment such as cracked windshields or a leaking hydraulic line. Good housekeeping on and near the crane area is essential for safety.

SIGNAL PERSON DUTIES
Find out the basic signals that your company uses. Be sure that you and the operator are using the same signals. Have only one signal person - more than one will confuse the operator. Also:
 

  • Always watch the load - the crane operator is watching you

  • Make sure the load does not pass above workers

  • Keep the crane at least 6 m (20 feet) away from power lines - keep an eye out overhead

COMMON SIGNALS

  1. Hoist: With forearm vertical, forefinger pointing up, move hand in small horizontal circles.

  2. Lower: With arm extended downward, forefinger pointing down, move hand in small horizontal circles.

  3. Stop: Arm extended, palm down, hold position rigidly.

  4. Emergency Stop: Arm extended, palm down, move hand rigidly right and left.

  5. Raise Boom: Arm extended, fingers closed, thumb pointing upwards.

  6. Lower Boom: Arm extended, fingers closed, thumb pointing downward.

  7. Swing: Point with finger in direction of swing of boom.

  8. Move Slowly: Use one hand to give any motion signal and place your other hand motionless in front of the hand giving the motion signal

SUMMARY

  • Every worker should know crane hand signals. Knowing the signals may allow you to help out when needed

  • If you are asked to be a signal person, make sure you are using the same signals as other workers and operators on the project

  • When tower cranes or situations where hand signals are not safe enough, ensure that a two-way radio is used for voice communication. This will give you direct contact with the operator.

  • Whatever system you use - hands or radio - make sure the equipment and workers are able to do the job right.

extendboom
EXTEND BOOM

Dog Everything
DOG EVERYTHING

Travel
TRAVEL

Retract Boom
RETRACT BOOM

EXTEND BOOM ONE HAND
EXTEND BOOM
(ONE HAND)

RETRACT BOOM(ONE HAND)
RETRACT BOOM
(ONE HAND)

HOIST
HOIST

LOWER
LOWER

USE MAIN HOIST
USE MAIN HOIST

USE WHIP LINE
USE WHIP LINE

RAISE BOOM
RAISE BOOM

LOWER BOOM
LOWER BOOM

MOVE SLOWLY
MOVE SLOWLY

RAISE THE BOOM & LOWER THE LOAD
RAISE THE BOOM &
LOWER THE LOAD

LOWER THE BOOM & RAISE THE LOAD
LOWER THE BOOM &
RAISE THE LOAD

SWING
SWING

STOP
STOP

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EMERGENCY STOP
EMERGENCY STOP

Copyright © 2016 All rights Reserved Marianne C. Rafferty